Peter Westheimer – Musician

Interviewed by Prue; edited by Mick

“To perform and share my music in a contemporary arena like Splendour is a total honour.” – Peter Westheimer

From a seven year old novice violinist to leader of the Victorian Youth Symphony Orchestra, to a degree in Medicine, to political street theatre performer, to writing and performing in bands, to composing music scores for film and TV, to a term as a councillor in the Byron Shire… Peter Westheimer’s list of achievements just goes on and on. Check out his website and you will get my drift. Also check out his latest project on youtube Tranzworld Express. Wow!

I met with Peter on a seemingly rare sunny day in Brunswick Heads for a coffee and a chat that lasted for as long as his bio. Clearly there was a lot to cover. Starting with the usual Very Byron question of ‘When and why did you come to the Byron Shire?’

Peter Westheimer

I came to Byron because I was interested in alternative culture, spirituality, and a hankering to reconnect with the land and country. I had grown tired of suburban Melbourne and after spending time in the warmth of Indonesia, studying Tai Chi and meditation, I chose to live in a warmer climate. When friends mentioned Mullumbimby I jumped on a train in 1974, not long after the Nimbin Aquarius Festival, and got off at ‘Mullum’. I eventually moved here in 1978 and after twelve months bought into an MO (Multiple Occupancy) near The Channon .

What did you do once you made the move?
I gained knowledge about the bush and building, and immersed myself in music full time. I wanted to venture beyond my classical music background so I tried Rock and New Wave… started playing in bands, writing and singing. Technology was beginning to emerge so I could put my music into the public arena myself, without a record company. I produced my first EP called ‘Laminex Lovers’ and it happened to get quite a lot of airplay on Triple J (Double J then). Then I enrolled in an Audio Engineering course at RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology).

You already had a degree in Medicine. Wow, you must really like studying?
Not really. I was well and truly over it so I didn’t sit any of the Audio Engineering exams.  I wanted the knowledge, not the qualification. I even rebelled against reading music scores.

So did you ever practice as a doctor?
Yes, until five years ago I practised part time in the fields of occupational health rehabilitation and in the legal side of medicine.

Was it a good time in your life?
Yeah… Medicine gave me an income to support my music. I practised for about nine years and in that time bought a house, renovated it and built a home studio. I was also doing a lot of composing for TV and film in Sydney. One day a director friend did a video clip to one of my tracks and it was nominated as one of the Top 10 Australian video clips of 1985 by the producer of Rage – Mark Fitzgerald.

In 1992 you were also invited into the ‘Musicians As Artists’ publication. How did that come about? Do you also paint?
For my 1992 album ‘Transition’, I painted a canvas to reflect moods and concepts of each track and launched the album in an art gallery restaurant. A friend of a friend was putting the publication together in Los Angeles and he had a spare spot. He thought it would be good to have an Australian inclusion… a case of right place, right time.

Book - Musicians as Artists

What an amazing experience. You share equal space with legends… John Lennon, Carly Simon, Ron Woods, David Bowie… the list goes on. If you are struggling to read the above list of legends, click here for a clearer image… it really is a spin out.

Peter’s paintings appeared along side legendary names like John Lennon, David Bowie, Iggy Pop and Ringo Starr, in the publication Musicians as Artists

So the creative process… when did you become aware of creating intuitively?
When I was a Med student I lived in a share-house near Melbourne Uni… lots of people would come through the house and we’d jam (me on the violin) and I soon realised I could create original music pretty easily. When I was in the right space, without getting too esoteric, I kind of channelled it. I use feeling and intuition for making music… I’ve rebelled against formalities of form and genre.

How do you get into the right space to create?
I simply spend time in my studio, or wherever, with the tools of songwriting… a laptop, good headphones, small mixer, decent speakers and good software.

I essentially do jam sessions with multi-track recorder software and overlay tracks… endlessly experimenting, adding and subtracting and ultimately honing  the sounds. For my current album, Tranzworld Express, I brought in Amir Paiss on Persian Santoor, and Parissa Bouas on vocals.

The creative splash of this album happened a few months after my mother died and I felt the need to look inside for a while. I took off across Europe for two months where I spent a lot of time on trains. It was then that I wrote Tranzworld Express… hence the strong train theme.

Publicity for Tranzworld Express

Interestingly, there is a train theme running here also – you arrived in the area by train and you are Vice President of TOOT (Trains On Our Tracks) … the local action group trying to get the Byron train running again. Have you always been a politically active person… is that why you became a councillor?
I‘ve been political since I was 21. At Uni I lead a protest about the way medical students were being treated. I also did a stint of funded political theatre. I was in a group called the The Portable Players, which was funded by the Australia Council and the Amalgamated Metal Workers Union.  We were paid to perform plays that questioned the establishment from an informed, and probably wholistic perspective, although that word was not in my lexicon then! I was also involved in street performance… protesting against the Vietnam War. When I came to this area I became involved in a variety of issues. In ‘92 I was part of the Suffolk Park Progress Association and we successfully took developers and Byron Council to court for over-development. I was also part of the Club Med push (a successful protest against Club Med building a resort in Byron).

Protestin for TOOT and Club Med
LEFT: TOOT lobbyists campaigning for reinstating the Casino to Murwillumbah train. Pic courtesy of toot RIGHT: Protesting against the Club Med development. PIC courtesy of John McCormick

I decided to run for Council because I was involved in so many local political issues I figured I may as well be on Council full time where I could be better informed and potentially have more influence on what was going on in the Shire. I also wanted to take a break from my music and be more involved with people. I had put out an album the year before I got onto Council… it was like a sampler, or taster for music to be synchronised in films, so it could do its thing in the background while I focused on my role as councillor.

What were some of the key things you hoped to achieve?
I wanted to support creative industries. I wanted to protect and enhance the environment… particularly biodiversity. I wanted to be a voice on Council to get trains back on our tracks, to build more cycleways and for public transport development throughout the Shire. I supported a Byron by-pass, but only if it was in conjunction with a Park and Ride system.

What was your greatest achievement as a councillor?
Getting the Mullum Civic Hall restored. It wasn’t part of my platform but I took it on as part of a personal initiative. It wasn’t the only thing I did but it took a good part of the four years I was there. The effort I had put in to make the restoration happen was enormous and the relief of its completion was very emotional. I am currently completing a stint as chairman of the Hall’s board of management, trying to introduce air conditioning, a portable stage, solar panels, improved acoustics, Internet capability and improved audiovisuals. Council staff obstructed these improvements when I was a councillor.

Was being a councillor a thankless task?
No, a lot of people thanked me. Some even gave me a hug. Generally I found it a positive experience. Not so much the hugs, but more the privilege of being a representative of such a vibrant, creative community. I have thought about running again but it is all-consuming… too many dealings with mediocre bureaucrats, too much mundane reading and too many sweet biscuits at too many meetings… and it’s stressful. You get paid the equivalent of the New Start Allowance… that’s a problem for many people who might consider being a councillor.

Do you think Australia is over-governed?
Definitely, Prue. My model would scrap the State Government tier and have larger regional councils answerable to the Federal Government. Too many local decisions are not understood and overridden by State bureaucracy. That sucks when your driving motivation for being on Council is your passion for the area.

Election Ads

Given Council elections will be in September this year, what advice would you give to a new, successful candidate?
Make the most of your first term. Choose two or three key areas in which you want to achieve something because as a councillor you are pushed laterally all the time… and be prepared to spend an inordinate amount of time reading material that’s not your core interest. Be positive, responsive and gracious with all the amazing people in this Shire. I did feel it was a privilege to be voted in… to have that amount of support. It was a great feeling.

One of the reasons I wouldn’t return to Council is I have found another vehicle, in the form of my music, to express myself politically. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been asked to perform at Splendour.

Do you consider it an honour to be invited to perform at Splendour?
Yes, absolutely. To perform and share my music in a contemporary arena like Splendour is a total honour. My show is evolving… it incorporates contemporary issues into the lyrics and partially fulfils my desire to speak out. For example, one track I’ll be performing is called ‘Change Now’. People don’t like change but the lyrics are all about it. Another track is called ‘Peace Dance’, which proposes if life is a dance then we might as well dance for peace.  I’m also singing about 100% renewable energy. I feel there is now a positive, achievable solution to this issue, so it’s worth trumpeting.

When are you performing?
I’m performing twice… at 9pm on the 27th and 28th July on the Temple Stage at the Global Village. The show will include videoclips of each track, costumery, masks and vocal overlays.

Bringing it back to Byron… is there anything else you like about living here?
I love the creative and political community and the extraordinary coastal and hinterland beauty. I do a lot of land and ecological restoration and I find every day I’m nurtured by this environment. It helps give meaning to my life. I like Byron, Bangalow, Mullum and Brunswick Heads for the urban fix, the people-part of life. I feel very fortunate. Generally I like the climate, except for summer…  it’s a bit hot.

Where in the Shire do you currently live?
I live on the land not far from Mullumbimby. It was pretty much all cleared when it was bought. I have been revegetating large sections of it… restoring the wildlife corridors with tree plantings and bush regeneration.

Are there any aspects about life here you find challenging?
One thing I still find challenging here, and why I remain politically active, is the terrible public transport. I grew up with good public transport in Melbourne and I have seen how effective it is in Europe… I’ve seen how disempowering the lack of transport is, particularly for the elderly and youth. I remain really passionate about that… hence my involvement in TOOT.

I am also guarded against rampant over-development. As beautiful as the Northern Rivers is, there is still a lot of degradation, and it is in our own interests, as well as tourists, to preserve and improve the natural attributes of this jewel in a challenging and challenged world.

What are your thoughts on tourism?
Tourists are inevitable… the question is how we manage them. The pressure of 1.5 million visitors a year on the Shire’s infrastructure is enormous. We don’t get enough financial support to accommodate the influx. I see good public transport as an essential.  A tourist bed tax would work too, if the State Government would allow it. They did it for the Sydney Olympics.

In the context of development, how do you see Byron Shire in 20 years time?
We are still operating under a 25 year state regional plan that started about 6 years ago. That plan sees neighbouring Shires ear-marked for growth, whereas Byron is not. We will still develop, I just hope sustainably… for example, where people aren’t so reliant on cars. I am optimistic that in 20 years time the Shire will be better than it is now more vegetated, cleaner rivers better transport and clean air.  However the newish NSW Liberal/National coalition could threaten the rural/village mosaic. We will need conviction councillors who are prepared to speak up for environmental protection, enhancement, and sustainable development.

Finishing up with some lighter questions… what’s your favourite local eating place?
Lulu’s (Mullum) for healthy and hearty food… The Poinciana (also Mullum) for ambience and the Top Shop and The Balcony for Byron ambience.

Do you have a favourite shop?
I’m a real fan of the markets. I go to the Mullum Farmers’ Market often. I like Santos and Edens Landing in Mullum for organic foods.

What’s your locals’ tip for tourists?
Oh, you must do the walk from the Pass to the Lighthouse via Little Wategos and stop in at either The Pass or Lighthouse Cafés… and Broken Head track from the caravan park is sensational for coastal views.

Cape Byron arial imageThis gorgeous arial image of the lighthouse (that has been graffitied by Prue – apologies Craig) is courtesy of Fotografx Photography, contact Craig Ching 02 6680 7977 fotografx@iprimus.com.au Top: The sensational views from the Broken Headwalking track

What’s your favourite thing to do in the Byron area?
I love walking in the hinterland bush and on the beach and having coffee with friends… and my music gigs… pretty simple really!

Simple huh? Well I should think so… with such a long list of achievements, I would be exhausted and seeking simplicity too had I achieved so much! Thanks again Peter for your time, it was incredibly generous, inspiring, somewhat overwhelming and a complete pleasure to meet you.

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Very Byron? Very Mullum!

Words by Melinda –  Image by Prue

Well as everyone knows in Byron… it’s obligatory to read  The Echo classifieds each week. Why? Well we just do! It’s the place to find out who’s in town to offer some new fandangle healing help, who’s just left (in the heavenly fashion) for greener pastures, who’s offering a good deal in rental (sadly this is rare these days), and who’s offering a job that is marginally more interesting  than the usual retail, hospitality and bookkeeping options! So it was with great delight to find this ad in the ‘positions vacant’ section for a Market Parking Manager at the Mullumbimby Farmers Markets. The thing is… I’m just not sure why they need someone to have knowledge of recycling, composting and worm farms whilst directing traffic???? But hey… it is Mullm after all.

Conversation with Glitter – RadioDJ + ReDesigner + RetroCollector

“My real name is Alysa Michele Moysey, but I changed it when a little hummingbird landed on Heidi May, the horse, and said you’ve got to change your name to Hummingbird!” – Alysa GG Hummingbird


Alysa GG Hummingbird at home in her House of Glitter

Alysa GG Hummingbird (AKA Glitter or GG) is one of Byron’s colourful characters who gratefully still exist in our community. She is a reminder of the playful, magical and alternate nature this community once relished before commercialism and tourism seemed to prioritise the look of Byron. Ten or so years ago people like GG were everywhere on our streets… hugging, laughing, playing music, performing and sharing their creative gifts and ideas. Unfortunately a dying breed these days due to busking restrictions and image conscious, identity crisis, business lore. It was a total delight visiting Glitter at her Byron home where we were taken on a magical ride through Elven folk lore and all things not very grown up. Continue reading

Conversation with Deva Nandan – 5Rhythms Dance + Giveaways

Deva Nandan

“For me it was like starting a new path…
Now it is through the 5Rhythms Dance that I express my heart.”

Deva is passionate about following her heart. It’s always been her path. This could also be said about her commitment to the Byron 5Rhythms Dance community. As a qualified teacher, every week, she holds the space with music and heart presence, as people explore themselves and their relationship to others through the expression of dance. 5Rhythms is a powerful tool for increasing self-awareness, and for some like Deva, a spiritual practice. We caught up with her recently to hear about her journey to Australia and introducing her passion to Byron Bay.

We can tell by your beautiful accent you are not originally from here. Where were you born?
In Angola, Africa, to Portuguese parents. Angola was colonised by the Portuguese and my parents lived there for 17 years. We left when I was three because of the colony war. My father was quite wealthy and had a lot of land, which the natives wanted. We fled to Brazil with nothing, lived there (Sao Paulo) for two years, and then went to Portugal when I was six.


Deva returned to her family in Portugal recently to walk some familiar streets
and take in the magnificent views of Lisbon

You came to Australia with your husband, Amito. What brought you both here?
Amito and I were living in Grand Cayman in the Caribbean. He was a dive instructor and I was a jewellery sales person making lots of money selling gold and Rolex’s (laughs). We lived there for 11 months until a category five hurricane wiped the place out in 2004. So we moved to the UK where the second module of my dance training was being conducted. But I wasn’t happy there – the people are very closed unlike the Caribbean paradise we had just come from. We knew we wanted to live in an English speaking country but we didn’t want to live in South Africa where Amito is from and we ruled out the States… our intuition led us to Australia, which felt really right. Amito is a civil engineer and since Australia needed them it was easy for him to be sponsored in a job.


Deva’s husband, Amito, travelled with her to Portugal… umm which one is he? 🙂

How did you come to be in Byron Bay?
I first heard about Byron from a guy I met whilst travelling through India. I went there to do a Vipassana meditation retreat. We travelled for three months and he was always talking about Byron, how amazing it was and especially the dance parties in the forest. When Amito and I came to Australia in 2006, we were looking to establish ourselves in a like-minded community. We first went up to Crystal Waters on the Sunshine Coast but we didn’t find it there so we ended up coming down to Byron. I instantly fell in love with it… the beaches, the beauty, and the weather.
Even though we both loved it here, Amito needed to be in Brisbane for work, so he based himself there whilst I stayed one night in a backpacker’s, and then went to Samaya Retreat in Rosebank. A month later I moved into Byron and started teaching in the scout hall. I was teaching on a Friday night and getting 70 people… the hall soon became too small! Meantime, the Civic Hall in Mullumbimby was being done up, so when it was complete I took the classes there. It is bigger and has a sprung floor…it’s really nice… perfect for dancing.


Some of Deva’s Indian travel shots – where she first heard about Byron Bay

What is 5Rhythms dance?
5Rhythms is a personal growth practice. It is a tool to experiment and reflect on who you are, through dance. My passion is to teach this practice. This is something the founder, Gabrielle Roth, teaches us… it’s a mind-body-spirit practice accessible to everyone.

What are the five rhythms?
The five rhythms are called – flowing, staccato, chaos, lyrical and stillness. They come together to create a ‘Wave’. They relate to different moods, life-cycles, emotions etc… which are expressed through different ways of moving, using five distinctive styles of music. As you dance you tend to find one rhythm that you are most comfortable with. This practice really frees you from conditioning and invites you to embody your truth.

Where did you train in dance?
I moved to London in ‘94 and discovered the classes there. I danced regularly for nine years before training as a dance teacher. The training involved three different modules… each one in a different place. I trained in New York, England and California for one and a half years under the tuition of the 5Rythms founder, Gabrielle Roth.

Deva dancing
Deva dancing 2
Deva in action – expressing her heart through dance

Some people who come to Byron, particularly on a spiritual path, decide to change their names. How did you come to take the name ‘Deva’?
I had friends in London who were Sanyassin so I was exposed to their way of being. It is based on the spiritual teachings of a guru named Osho. So I went and learnt about Osho and the meditation practice he teaches. In India, I stayed in an Ashram, a beautiful environment where I meditated every day. The people really lived fully and celebrated life. They primarily follow their hearts and I too have always followed my heart so it felt completely natural for me to be in that environment.

Is that when you changed your name?
Yes. I was given ‘Deva Nandan’ which means Divine Garden.

Who gave you your name?
At that time in the Ashram there were three options. One was to keep my birth name but do the ceremony to become a Sanyassin, the second was to take a mysterious name… which is what I chose, and the third was a list I could choose from. The mysterious version was where they had a team of people that meditated on your photograph and the information you provided, and they would intuitively feel the name for you.

Did taking this name change your life in any way?
For me it was like starting a new path. I had been bought up in a very conservative family so following the heart, like the Sanyassins, really resonated with me. Now it is through the 5Rhythms Dance that I express my heart.


Everybody can dance the 5Rhythms of life!

What sort of path were you on before you found 5Rhythms?
It’s funny but I originally trained as an industrial and jewellery designer, which I did for 15 years… but even when I was designing jewellery I was following the philosophy of 5Rhythms… I was already bringing movement into my designs and mixing them up. I can feel that I have a longing to come back to jewellery design but now I am studying Kinesiology, which is a whole new area that I love. Once again, it is healing and working with people.

What do you love about Byron?
I love the beaches, the dolphins, and the whales. I lived in Main Arm for two years and I love the forest there…I love walking to Devils Hole which is a bit of a secret… it’s near Mt Jerusalem. I love walking in nature. Minyon Falls is another beautiful walk. I also like the craft at the markets. I love the people here and how relaxed they are. Everyone seems happy. You walk down the street and people smile.
And even though I don’t do much of it, I love horse riding on the beach… Oh and I love going to the farm to get milk…

Where is this milk farm? We keep hearing about it.
It’s on Myocum Road between Mullum and Byron. You go there with your container and pay a dollar for a litre. The farmer is about 90 and he allows people to help themselves to the milk and leave the money.

It’s easy to talk about all the things we love about Byron and we know you are now moving to base yourself in Brisbane to be with Amito; what have been some of the challenges of living here?
OMG… the challenges of renting! Being at the whim of landlords you get moved around. I was in a place that I didn’t know was an illegal dwelling and the landlord informed me recently of a council inspection so I had to move out of there. It was really annoying but in this case it worked for me because I was ready to move back to Brisbane to be with Amito. I also found it hard to have stable friendships because of the transient nature of the place. You make friends and lose them because they have to move on. This can be a bit sad sometimes.


Markets, beaches and horseriding… just some of the things Deva loves about Byron

And what we say is…

If you haven’t explored 5Rhythms Dance and have been thinking about it… do it! Speaking with a friend the other night, he was saying how dancing two nights a week in Melbourne was like dancing for his sanity. Deva is the original deal of 5Rhythms in Byron and brings to this community a world of experience, professionalism and a compassionate heart. Every Tuesday night you will find her at the Mullumbimby Civic Hall setting up the audio equipment for the thoughtfully chosen music, and creating artistic installations with subtle lighting for atmosphere. She smudges the room with sage for clarity and sacredness so that when the music begins at 7pm and people step into the space, the best of intentions have been set. The rest is up to you… to take the ensuing guidance and opportunity of movement to free yourself. You won’t regret it.

Giveaway – 5 passes to 5Rhythms Dance, Mullumbimby
Deva is kindly offering five single passes to five of our readers to attend one of her classes on Tuesday evenings, 7pm – 9pm, Mullumbimby Civic Hall. If you would like to receive one of these passes please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Five winners will be chosen at random.


Just love this photo of Deva taken in Portugal…
too many skulls can make a girl feel a bit nervous!

THE BYRON QUESTIONS:

Do you have a favourite café?
Not really. I don’t really hang out in cafes much.

What about restaurant?
Milk and Honey in Mullum

Do you have a favourite shop?
The Piece Gallery in Mullum. I always love going in there. So many beautiful things.

What is your local’s tip for a visitor to Byron?
For sure the lighthouse walk, the markets… and a vist to Bangalow. Oh, my dance class (laughs). It is a really unique thing to do. I love Kiva Spa…I go there often, and also have a massage with Leslie who works at Mullum Herbs… she is great. Oh, and Lucy the ceramicist at the Wheel of Life in Brunswick… I love her work. I bought tea cups recently as gifts for my homecoming in Portugal. I love cats so I love hanging out at the Cat Adoption Centre, too.

What would we find you doing on a typical Saturday?
(Shrugs shoulders)…I don’t have a typical Saturday. Sometimes I’m doing workshops or going for a really long walk. I mean a really long walk… usually along Brunswick Beach. I walk till there is no one around and I feel the space. After coming from Europe where it is so populated I love the space here in Australia.

Carnivale of Life and Death – 11.11.11


The Carnival will be held this weekend Fri 11, Sat 12 & Sun 13 November
at the Civic Hall and Heritage Park in Mullumbimby

We interviewed Zenith Virago, our community ‘Death Walker’,  a few months ago when she shared her plans to create a major event encouraging the community to celebrate life and death in a creative and fun way. Well the day is nigh and Zenith tells us how we can get involved…

Byron is a great place to live, but it is also great place to die.  We are cutting edge of a more natural approach to death and dying, celebrating our diverse lifestyles in a deathstyle that is meaningful and inspiring. For those who don’t follow a traditional faith, the opportunity to connect to something meaningful and sacred is a precious and healing part of saying goodbye and living with loss. This is the 5th year for the Day of the Dead Ceremony and we wanted to create something bigger and more diverse,  to offer a better ‘way to go’ to everyone in any of our various communities.  We are really blazing a trail that others are starting to pick up and run with, as they understand it helps to create a healthier bereavement and thus a more connected community.

An awareness and fund raising event put on by Zenith and the Natural Death Centre (NDC), the Carnival of Life and Death (COLD) comprises several innovative events with an aim to highlight creativity, movement and colour into our experiences of loss of our loved ones and also our own mortality.  The NDC is committed to empowering people around end-of-life choices and to creating a cultural change for the better.

Continue reading

Very Mick does Social Media for Dummies

Very Mick Mono“…it appears I’m about to spend this entire class just trying to log on.”

My very first ‘Social Media For Business’ class at the ACE Community College in Mullumbimby, and of course, out of ten students, I’m the bunny who knows bugger-all about Facebook … the bottom rung on the social media ladder. What’s worse, I’m in front of a PC for the first time and unable to find the button that turns the damn thing on (a sad reminder of my first dating experience). My pain is exacerbated by a competitive streak wider than Ian Thorpe’s fin-span. I don’t do classroom-loser well. This can be attributed to chocolate, for in my primary school days whole blocks of the stuff were the learning enticement to win at everything from Times Tables to Let’s Find Wally. Even now, in my fifties, I’m convinced being first to finish a yoga class will fast-track my enlightenment. Continue reading

Conversation with Patt Gregory – Woodworker

“My passion is teaching people woodwork. I love introducing new wood workers to woodwork. And I always start the courses by telling my new students a bit about myself…I don’t hide anything.” – Patt Gregory

It was one of those glorious Northern Rivers winter ‘days of old’. You know the ones we USE to have this time of year…..weeks of them. The dry season they use to call it. Well taking full advantage of the picture perfect weather we took the back roads to Mullum to have a chat with the beautiful Patt Gregory of  ’Woodwork for Women’ fame. What a treat. The venue of choice for our chat was the Mullum institution – The Poinciana Café. We settled in there with all the other locals, Patt being one of them having lived in Mullum now for 18 years… and in the very same house she and her husband first occupied when they arrived. Wow, that surely places her in the ‘true locals’ category!



Patt Gregory and her self published book

We started our chat with the usual question of…

…who, how or what brought you to this area?
My husband Michael. We were living in Melbourne and he went to Mullum to visit a mate and came back raving about the place saying we should go up for a holiday…which we did. His mate said ‘it’s the best place in the world, you should move up here’. So in the space of 24 hours we had decided to move here and six weeks later, I had sold a business and packed up a house. Continue reading